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20131208
20131208
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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
immigrant it's an organization that i went to as a young child. it's a full circle to come back and have serve the community. my mother went there seeking help. i get the combrieths i understand the immigrant experience and how to better their lives. as that's the main inspiration i try to lead by example. i'll honored to be reconsidered for this appointment and if you have any questions, i'll be happy to answer them. i'm sorry how long have you been on the commission >> two years. >> okay two years and what have you accomplished. >> we worked 45rd we created legislation policies in the if not community within san francisco. we try to hold a series of hearings we want to push for expensive immigration reform. we're going to continue to work toward this. we worked really hard to work on a variety of bill from understanding critical policies and we've worked hard for the due process and workers rights. we know how important city college is to immigrant community. and we needed to convey how important to keep city college open it's a lifeline for immigrant and what they contribu
and killed an immigrant from ecuador. he was not alone that night, walking with his best friend, and he survived the the attack, but the other did not. there were many reasons why i was attracted to the story. one of themfuls the nature of the crime. i found out early on that this young people, and they were very young, they were 17 and 18 at the time, juniors and seniors in high school, made it a practice, sport if you will, or entertainment to go around hunting for beaners, which is what they call immigrants. for somebody on that immigrated from mexico. they talk about how they were looking for illegals from mexico. so i was horrified by that, of course, as anybody would be, the fact that young people think so little of human life as to go out hunting for people as they were preyed. i wrote a story about study, two sociologists released from university, state university of albany, in which they said immigrants where no longer going to the city. they were, in fact, bypassing the cities and moving to suburb suburbia. that was happening all over the country, not just with hispanic immigr
to the immigrant rights commission there are 8 seats and 6 applicant. >> okay. we have the immigrant affairs office here. >> good afternoon chair joe and supervisor breed and supervisor cowen. it's an honor to see you. i think we're at an should not moment in the history of the immigrants rights commission we have a number of should not folks who are interested in joining the commission. the commission has been here for over 16 years and not as effective as it is now. in the past few years the commission has conducted over - we have public safety and federal immigration and that's for protecting community. the commission is also issued several major reports on expensive glths reform and recently held a meeting on the court instructs the jury closer. so today, the commission is recognized for a vicinities for the city's underserved community. this is due in large part because of the partnership with my office. the commissioners that come to meeting they listen to the community, they do all even though heavy lifting on behalf of their fellow commissioners they're a diverse co- he was group th
they know brown doctor moedz his work was you instrumental and the voices of the immigrant in this community it should be said that he helps in public health and unemployment and getting the social services that's one person that's been the bridge and the animal health fair. i saw one nonprofit organization from the western edition from china town hall from the hispanic community he goes auto he's also a board member of y cd you've all spoken in terms of employment for the protecting san franciscans the doctor is a fine person. and lastly we need hispanics on the commission so this community needs representation >> i'm here with selena less than to ask for your support in rereinstating her as vice chair and talk about the other commissioners the other seats 4, 6, 8 and lifting. this is personally one of the most important commissions it keeps us you plugged into the community. on particularly our immigrant community. one of the biggest challenges is keeping the full commission. i'm totally on the attention when we first took over that was a problem. there were 15 commissio
in both houses where he's able to get things done. like immigration, like a lot of things in implementing fully obama care? >> to me there's an interesting thing here of what comes between those two points. if you look at the speech he gave on economic justice wednesday, clearly the president has big ideas, has a big agenda. he's not done with that. these are things he's discussed from the very beginning since he began running in 2007. to me what was interesting in watching your interview yesterday was when he talked about republicans. it's not he's completely resigned to the obstructionism, that they've presented, but i didn't get a sense of a lot of fight. he talked about being persistent. but i think if he wants to rally those segments of the electorate that robert just talked about, he has to be concrete in what he's asking people to rally behind. take some of these grand ideas that he talked about on wednesday that he's talked about before whether it's raising the minimum wage, expanding head start to get investment going. whatever he talked about, he has more credibility now with th
challenges whether fiscal, immigration, fixing the health care bill. whatever it is, american people want answers, solutions. you can play the party game, political fight, it ends up blowing up in your face. republicans if you look head to head suffer more of the criticism. that's just the fact and reality. >> the president has done divisive politics and deflection and some in your party have done race-baiting. you are right, chris, they want solutions. they don't want politics, they want policy. people are tired of living paycheck to paycheck losing their homes. some people can't get a job. >> how do we get there, angela? what do you do in washington? >> if you continue to have partisanship, you're going to have a lame duck president. i believe midterm elections, gop has a grand opportunity to reach out to those pop that have suffered the most. they can take over the house and senate if they do grassroots advocacy, if the tea party and party establishment would join as one we have a grand opportunity. >> chris, last word. >> a lot of this is going to fall on republicans come midterms, wh
plated of america the beautiful and the immigration officer said it will she was not what it is which is the star spangled banner, but i'm afraid that's one wrong. you've only got nine more chances. a distinct possibility vimy denied permission. and then was one man. complicated story helicon about. they have not talked to people to take the oath on the after deck of the u.s.s. constitution which is this wonderful sailing vessel, the oldest commission water should actually in the world. nelson's victory. but this one does. so the of was performed on independence day 2011 during a hot day. it was just magical an incredibly moving paid have to say. i've never seen an immigration ceremony, all people who suddenly were free to do with their waste. and they can vote. they had no fear of arrest. all of it. it was wonderful. the judges on the end was as remarkable woman who has now become a great personal friend. i have lunch with her. she is called marion bolar. she was the judge at the moment in charge of the boston america to the boston marathon bombing case. when that yemen will cut she
in detroit. >> i completely agree with that. let's talk about immigration reform. and the latino community. again, i'm just going down their list. so, you know. so john boehner on november 14th says, we have no intention of ever going to conference on the senate bill. he even, you know, kind of brushed off those two sweet, precious girls who are trying to talk to him while he was having his breakfast. the one person,on than, who had made some inroads, i think you had wrote about this, was chris christie. this week he had a major change of heart, didn't he? >> yes. it was the week after thanksgiving. it was late november. chris christie won re-election in new jersey by winning 51% of the latino vote. and how did he get that vote? by campaigning on -- by saying he would sign the new jersey version of the dream act. he had lots of people, latinos, on record as saying i voted for him because of this. and then sometime around november 27th, on a radio show, he was asked about this. he said, well, i -- i don't favor the senate version of this bill. i don't favor it. all the sudden you're like, w
of the problems with japan, for example, it doesn't take immigrants. so they don't attract the world's smallest individuals like we still do, although we're trying to keep them out. you agree with bret? >> you know, i really don't. let me give you two examples that's not really my example. it's their examples. switzerland and lick ken stein, this is what came out of these two countries. their administrators said, look, we are life specks in the world economy. we are just a teeny little country and we understand that we have to be better than most if we're going to compete. so what both of those countries have done is make the concerted effort to emphasize mathematics instruction. they take upwards of eight hours of math a week. and they have innovative program to teach it. they understand that their kids are going to have to know this stuff. they drill them. they discipline them and they succeed. it's not rocket science. and i think if our schools understood that they were in the same competitive pool that we would try to do the same sort of innovation and i will say one more thing. if the teac
spoken here about immigration. i always have a wonderful interaction with the young people here. they're doing a great job. >> well, let's play "hardball." >> let's do it. >> you have a great audience here of college age people and graduate students and faculty. there's some resistance out there among young people. have seen it in the polls to enrolling in the exchanges and get involved in taking responsibility for their health care. what's your argument why they should do that? >> well, first of all, i understand why people would have been resistant to going on a website that wasn't working right. and fortunately because of some very hard work, we've now got it to the point where for the vast majority of people it's working well. and my message to the young people is take a look for yourself. the truth is that most college-aged students because of the law can stay on their parents' plan and that may be the best deal for them. we've already insured about 3 million people. and your first job where you don't have full health insurance benefits may mean that you stay on your parents' pla
name isenhe and i immigrated to the u.s. in 2001 and moved to the nob hill neighborhood two years ago. my wife and i use no. 10 or 12 bus lines to get to chinatown. however, the tep proposes to eliminate the no. 12 and in other words, this is a serious cut service cut and will have a dramatic affect on the community. they will have to carry heavy packages and walk steep hills to get home. it's extremely important to the community, especially for senior residents who often have mobility issues. please don't eliminate the no. 12 bus lines. any elimination means service cuts to our community, which heavily relies on public transit. thank you. >> thank you, next speaker, please. [ applause ] [ reading speakers' names ] >> good afternoon, sir. >> good afternoon, mr. chairman, directors, phil chin, representing the chinatown transportation research and improvement project. no need to repeat all that has been said. our concerns are very similar to other previous speakers. our concerns with with the 8x and stop placement for the 30. i would like to urge this board to direct staff to actu
criminals. component, of course, is to provide a network to monitor organized crime and illegal immigration. often to save the lives of people in distress at sea. critics say the system is more about turning away migrants than helping them. it started operation on the southern and eastern borders. monday, the un's human rights chief has evidence that syrian government officials have committed crimes against humanity. she called on the international criminal court to open a probe into the civil war. she said responsibility for atrocities committed in the searing conflict extended to the top echelon of government, including president bashar al- assad. brewers started lobbying for a year unity lot. they are hope -- a beer unity law. in 1516, the bearberry and ruler decreed beer could only be made with water, malt, hops, and yeast and nothing else. there was relative calm on the streets of the thai capital after days of angry protests. police itrs and should can says the government took steps to calm a dangerous escalation of violence. police were ordered to stand back as demonstrators calling
and telling several business interests in texas he will srted holding immigration votes after the candidate filing deadline for the 2014 midterms. maybe we have a sense of what we can expect. you don't have to tell the chamber of commerce, president tom donohue, that the speaker is working to enact immigration reform he assured everyone last month boehner would do exactly that. it tells you mr. donohue knows what he's talking about or is the man giving the orders, we don't know. the only question is whether boehner is doing as he' told. we'll find out. we're back with monica and matt and david. david, let's begin with you. the millennials, we're talking a sizable number calling for a recall. 47% of millennials in the harvard survey called for the recall as opposed to 46 who oppose it. this is strong stuff from the millennials. these are supposed to be his peeps. >> when you look at your future and don't see upward mobility as part of your picture, whether you put in time in technical school in college on your master's. if you see no future, you don't want to stay home forever and be the kid
's by no means a lot of them. but sure enough the influx of immigrants court alien french culture as courageous use problems for frost. you love to be two mistakes he amassed from the band is a healthy organization for frost. skoda is the same kind of organization. that's a good peaceful one. i thought that the partition independence square. more liberal participants keen to distance themselves from school but that he might answer there are lots of radicals they don't represent all people this is a small number the sea being provoked said we think is a bad thing because it's damaging the image of the revelation and ninety nine and anonymity master list flags and slogans on the square testified to a marriage of convenience that could prescribe the inconvenient for ukraine's opposition in the future. our days of tough negotiations are on top and sides agree on the indonesian island of bali resulting was described as an historic deal for the world trade organization let it fall short sometimes expectations of taxing its commitments to simplify customs procedures it can also add spaces they say eco
, the mustard. >> opened on new york's lower east side in 1888, katz's jewish immigrant founders brought their recipes for cured beef from eastern europe. >> is there an art to making a good sandwich? >> it's an art form. every piece of meat is different. got to treat it like you would a baby. >> does katz's ever advertise? >> no. you don't need to. >> it's all word of mouth. >> yes! yes! >> it was in katz's where harry met sally in the 1989 film and had their famously orgasmic meal. katz's name isn't even mentioned in the movie. but word got around. >> i'll have what she's having. >> oh, yeah. >> this summer 20 couples from the comedy group improv everywhere, slipped in to katz's and recreated the movie scene. >> oh, yes! >> did you know that was coming? >> no idea. >> you thought about joining in? >> no. >> what has that movie scene meant to this business? >> every once in awhile a review, that movie put you on the back. we were here a hundred years before the movie was made. >> it didn't hurt. >> you need a ticket to get in. they will charge you $50 if you lose it. it's how katz's kee
are typically immigrants, seniors, families and there is a disproportionately high number of children as well as some of our city's lowest income and longest term residents. they live in very affordable units but lack tenant rights. a study in district 11 showed that 45% of residents and in-laws don't even have written leases with their landlords. for many year, there have been significant calls for legalization, inlaw secondary units are simple and cost effective methods of increasing our cost effective supply, organizations from spur to the housing action coalition and tenant organizations have encouraged our city to consider legalization, but unfortunately, we have had a don't ask, don't tell policy, we have turned a blind eye to inlaw policies, it has eliminated an average of 100 in-laws each year. what i'm proposing today is that we adopt a voluntary policy in the city to allow for the legalization of in-laws, we allow owners to voluntarily approach the city to legalize one existing inlaw unit without an additional permit. in my legislation, it would waive local planning rules that don't
spent time with his uncle who's had some immigration problems. they said before that he had never met with them. it turned out that when he first went to harvard law school he stayed at his home for a couple of weeks. they said, well, why did you tell us before that he hadn't and now you tell us he has? the answer was, well, we didn't ask him before. it's an odd way to get information. >> you have been in that anchor seat for a decade, chris. congratulations. your anniversary is coming up. >> thank you. it's been the dream job of my career. look at that. that's depressing. ronald regan used to say seeing himself in old movies was like seeing a son he never knew he had. >> chris, i have to say something to you, a compliment. look at the head of hair you have, then and now. you've got a good head of hair, mister. >> the only thing out of date there is the suit. >> thank you. it's all mine. i appreciate that, khanna. >> on chris wallace's show, they'll be remembering ten years. who else is coming up? >> we'll be talking to rand paul not only about obama care but on wednesday he went to d
immigration reform. i mean, if you look at what the senate did, there is a path there that a lot of people compromised on to create the path to citizenship plus ways of making sure that we take people out of the shadows, we grow our economy, and we make sure our borders are secure. and so first and foremost, the house of representatives needs to focus on that. and i was part of the fast for families yesterday. having been arrested on the whole process of trying to get to immigration reform and whatnot. in terms of education, this is an issue. pre-k is an issue about showing whether the results actually really matter and what the research actually really matters, or whether the congress lives in an evidence-free zone. we have seen pre-k actually works to help level the playing field. the president has put a bill out there. the house of representatives actually have a bipartisan bill, that lies in the house of representatives and the senate, the miller-harkin bill that has two republicans from new york state. i give them huge props for being part of it, hannah and grim. that pre-k bill shoul
the two areas. you will need immigration sooner or later if you want your economy to continue growing. immigration will probably come naturally from latin america. it even has a political dividend your. there is a tremendous opportunity for the u.s. in latin america. china is very interested in latin america is energy biodiversity.our they want to invest in latin america. they are welcome. >> thank you. we are almost out of time. one less question -- and it couple of housekeeping matters. i want to remind you about our upcoming speakers. december 10, we have the mayor of houston, texas. december 16, the chairman and ceo of general motors. december 19, a grammy award winner and bluegrass legend. second, i would like to present our guest with the traditional national press club coffee mug coakley to be filled with colombian coffee. [laughter] >> thank you. >> thank you. [applause] and for the final question, you mentioned the prospect of colombia's national soccer team. the prospect of our two countries in the world cup? >> i wish our teams would not meet in the first round. it would be
on the president to lift immigration from his country and calls for a meeting. mark morgan with the sport highlights ahead. >> welcome back. new concertains for those applying for federal healthcare. health officials are discouraging people from lodging paper applications. consumers need to enrol by december 23rd for coverage to begin in january. tobacco analysts say sales for cigarettes will double, toppling 1.7 billion. they were invented to be safer than tobacco cigarettes. government agencies say they could pose unknown risks. >> electronic cigarettes are popular. it is called vaping. >> it should be a good thing, it's a step in a smarter tobacco. >> it was a smart move for this man. >> i tried patches and guns. these are the only things that worked for me. >> they don't have the tar of cigarettes, but they can deliver nicotine. >> they are catching on. >> intuitively. these are nicotine systems with dozens of other chemicals. the odds that this is harmless, harmless to those taking in second hand vapours is small. >> the los angeles city council passed a law requiring a licence, bann
talking to about everything from obamacare to immigration reform. that's something he has held near and dear to his heart since he came to office. where are we? are we going to be able to pull that off? >> that's right. >>> we'll also be talking about the building boom. you have seen san francisco's exploding skyline. therefore there are cranes everywhere. >> that's right. it will lead to incredible increase in population in san francisco and the entire region. we'll talk about what this means for people in brent wood, fremont, all across the bay area. >>> workers are demanding a hike to the minimum wage. president obama weighed in on this. now we have local leaders weighing in on this. phil you have an interview with some of them. >> first let's take a step outside because you probably noticed it's really cold. it has been for several days and the cold snap will continue. we are taking a live look outside. you can see the bay bridge. it looks nice but again jacket and scarf weather. you see the temperatures are in the 20s in some spots. otherwise we're making it up to the upper 30s
fdr he has pushed the limits of executive authority on domestic matters to the limits. on immigration reform he's decided not to and all welfare laws, education, anti-drug laws, he has simply decided not to enforce divisions of the law and the biggest example is obama care where the employer mandate was delayed a year. if you like your insurance, you get to keep it well. turns out the law says, no, you can't. so he directed the state incidents to direct the insurance companies to go ahead and provide the same policies they had had before and also there's no subsidy provided for the federal exchanges as there is the state exchange and these are a lot of examples that more than any recent president has pushed his power to the limit, thus raising the question about whether he is upholding himself to faith fully execute the laws. >> the president has made an announcement, members of congress have said, okay, we'll codify that. we'll put it into legislation and then the white house immediately threatens to veto it. what kind of message does that send to those who are skeptical about that?
and on the other hand, senate has passed some bills like immigration reform that have crawled to a halt in the house. now congress has passed some major legislation. things like the violence against women act. overall, what is going on here is divided government with sharply divided politics. it means all of these folks up here have one major accomplishment they share. this is the least productive congress in modern history. back to you. >> all right, lisa dejourdan. thank you. >>> coming up, the focus of our debate for you with the political panel. can lawmakers stop playing the blame game long enough to get a little bit of work done? panelists will break it down. >> and our fourth question, what about the markets this week? and the economy. well, there is plenty to look out for. zane asher is at the new york stock exchange. zane? >> deb, this upcoming week on wall street, we will introduce a brand new airline. well, kind of. american and u.s. air will merge into the biggest airline monday. ceos of the two companies will bring the nasdaq's opening bill. ticket will be aal. new name, am
to immigration, to other things that individual musicians care about. >> right. it's certainly not one that mobilized so many people to make such a political change, but i do want to switch gears for a little bit because i would be remiss if i didn't mention the fact that john lennon today, 33 years, people gathered around strawberry field right outside the home of where he was killed. just take a little bit of a listen for a second. ♪ good day sunshine ♪ good day sunshine >> john lennon really pushed for love and peace and very much in the mind and spirit of nelson mandela,as well. one what did the world lose when john lennon was shot? his music continues and even younger generations are catching on, basically. >> what do you think? >> there were a lot of great possibilities if john lennon had stayed alive. we missed whatever he would have been doing for the last 33 years. also, there's a good chance that the beatles would have gotten back together if he'd lived. >> wow! that would have been incredible. anthony decurtis, thank you so much. i could sit here and talk to you for hour
led to complete and total gridlock there,'s no movement on immigration reform. there's no movement on any other economic or budget matters, and that's going to be even more problematic. i think when people see those two sides put up against one another, that they actually appreciate the appreciate the position that we're fighting. >> i'll let you do that right when we get back, but we have to take a quick break here. the republicans are getting some tutoring, learning how to run against women. i'm not kidding. you can fill that box and pay one flat rate. i didn't know the coal thing was real. it's very real... david rivera. rivera, david. [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. simple, flat rate shipping with the reliability of fedex. ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ [ male announcer ] the beautifully practical and practically beautiful cadillac srx. get the best offers of the season now. lease this 2014 srx for around $349 a month. during the season's best event from cadillac. ♪ is caused by people
, this will be his legacy issue. and if you look at the chances of getting immigration reform, of getting some kind of comprehensive jobs bill, of getting some kind of infrastructure, of getting tax reform which is what businesses say they'll need, he may have to use the next three years to make it work, and this may be what he's left with as his big legacy issue. >> but you write it's not just about the website. there are a lot of challenges ahead about will this thing float? >> the website is not fixed, either, particularly on the backhand. you have to deliver the information to the insurer and you're not getting accurate information to them. they don't know who is signing up. that's the big problem, young people not signing up right now in the numbers they have to to make this work long term, so you'll see problems with people not just losing their insurance policies but beginning to see what these narrow networks in these new policies. i can't keep my doctor, and by the way, maybe the price is not going up in 2014 by policy but by 2015, and that politics is going to roll out and hurt the democr
of the last six elections. questions about insensitivity to women parallel the same issues like immigration. they feel no incentive to get things done because so few of them are in the district with large hispanic population, but the party overall recognizes that it wants to get this off the table for 2016. the issues with rem women are exactly the same. having said that, mitt romney beat barack obama by 14 points among white women. so democrats are not immune to challenges in that part of the electorate especially as the economy has struggled. ron brownstein, appreciate it. >> a heartfelt good-bye to actor paul walker. fans are gathering to honor him. we'll take you to his special tribute. my name is mike and i quit smoking. chantix... it's a non-nicotine pill. i didn't want nicotine to give up nicotine. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. [ mike ] when i was taking the chantix, it reduced the urge to smoke. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suici
think is not just special immigrant named. she remembered people. that's how she got her political power. she said why is things like, don't worry what people are thinking about you because they don't do it that often. or she would say, we would all have a better perspective on life if we knew that the number of people at our funeral would only depend on the weather. or, every politician should know that one day he or she will be replaced. her parents had originally had a homestead on lake coeur d'alene. her father go to help up there and ran a steamboat, mail route on lake coeur d'alene. they built their form, their dairy farm just about five miles north of here, and that's where she was born with four older brothers and two younger brothers. she was asked to the reporter for coeur d'alene press, straight out of high school, and she took some of the births and deaths at first. and then she went on and did almost everything for the press. she went from there to become an administrative assistant for the governor. she had been covering political things for the press, and covered the secon
a lot of money because my client thinks this is cool. [laughter] omlt's of immigran immigrant con believes nothing further is a good thing. frankly, almost every american delays not being the federal government. i've had very few people rush in and say i feel so bad. could i give them more? [laughter] so the second phase would be to i shall bring people who do it well. the third phase would be in a very calm way to bring in the people currently in charge and just say, explain the system. this is a system -- this is what i learned from taking a tutorial from the father of the call the movie. this is not about bad people. these are decent people in a terrible system. and so you have to say tell me what the system is. and then you ought to bring in experts who can say, all right, here is a system that works and here's a system that fails. if you want to get to the system that works it means you have to have these changes. i think what would be very helpful for the country at the last stage of these countries would be members talking among themselves in public and saying given what we
immigrants seeking to go to china as a haven from whatever problems they may face at home. i think the key to america's future is not what china does. it is what america does. ande develop our economy govern ourselves effectively, i think our soft power, economic power, and military power will be very adequate to our needs. china is making progress. we should hope china makes progress. after all, it is 20% of the world's people. we ought to wish them the best. on the other hand, we ought to be mindful of our own security and other interests. host: we have one viewer that puts it this way. the same people that fear competition fear china. guest: i do not know how you can be a capitalist and fear competition. we think that is a driving engine. if the chinese become more innovative, we've got to educate our kids and grandkids to innovate even faster. values out-of-the-box thinking, entrepreneurship, venture capital. i think we are constructed as a society to be very competitive in the 21st century. china has lots of problems that limit its capacity to be as competitive as we can be. the tradi
people's kitchens when they're poor and working class and latino and african-american and immigrant women. yet, i was about to sort of push back against that, and yet the men who are there are not necessarily, for the most part, from those communities. but stay with us, because it's not exclusively a republican issue, and in fact, i think our vice president, joe biden, might be able to teach republicans a few things about running against women. >>> republicans aren't the only ones that have to tread carefully when running against women. let's compare vice president joe biden's performance in his debates in 2008 and in 2012. here he is in attack dog mode against congressman paul ryan last year. >> we have these sanctions in place. it's in spite of their opposition -- >> oh, god. >> they've given 20 waivers to this sanction. under a romney administration, we will have credibility on this issue. >> vice president biden? >> it's incredible. when governor romney's asked about it, he's said, we've got to keep these sanctions. and he's said, you're talking about doing more. are you going to go t
and around the world. we want to allow immigration to our country where people have capital. right now we're losing people. people are going to canada because the income tax is 15% so canada is getting all these great entrepreneurs from around the world and we're losing them. why? corporate income tax is 35%. economic enterprise zones would expedite these visas for people who have $50,000. let them come to our country. i don't think you want a handout. just look at your history of innovation. look at the proud history of detroit. look at henry ford who not only produced a car that his assembly line men and women could afford to buy, he also shortened the workweek and increased wages. we were the industrial giant of the world. detroit was the greatness of america. government didn't do this. you did this. government didn't discover and create motown greats like smoky robinson or diana ross. today doesn't need to be any different. we need to look at ourselves, look in the mirror and allow ours the freedom to create and innovate. you have leaders like this. think of dan gilbert of quicken loa
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)